1. Fall is a great time to apply Beneficial Nematodes!

    If you suspect that your yard may be infested with fleas, beneficial nematodes are a good choice for control. They are microscopic worms that are broadcast into the soil. They feed on flea larvae and can also help with fire ants, white flies, grubs among other undesirable lawn pests. If you pull white socks over your ankles and walk around the yard for a few minutes you should be able to see fleas…Read More

  2. Fire Ant Baits

    We use a professional grade fire ant bait(Advion Fire Ant Bait) that works very well and very quickly. The active ingredient is indoxacarb which is synthetic, but very low in toxicity, even to aquatic life. We broadcast the bait granules throughout the yard and worker ants bring it back to feed the colony. As the ants' metabolism activates the indoxacarb, it is changed from that very low toxicity …Read More

  3. Hidden Fire Ants

    Just because you don't see fire ant mounds in the yard doesn't mean they aren't there. They're just not making visible mounds because of the heat and drought. They move deep underground where they can obtain water and where temperatures are cooler. After a rain the mounds pop up out of the wet soil. Baiting for fire ants should be done when the ground is dry and fire ants are foraging. Always foll…Read More

  4. Fire Ant Season is Approaching!

    With all the recent rain you may have seen fire ant mounds popping up as they get themselves out of the waterlogged soil.  Although they are visible they probably aren't foraging yet. Using baits for fire ant control is the best and least toxic way of handling them. However, if the soil temperature is below 70 degrees they probably won't be foraging which means the bait won't get picked up in a t…Read More

  5. Texas Leaf Cutter Ants

    Leaf cutter ants can damage fruit trees and ornamental vegetation quickly. They can be very difficult to handle. These ants have very large colonies that can spread up to 100 ft long under the ground. They use the leaves they bring back to the colony as a fungus farm to feed the colony. For this reason baits tend to be ineffective. A special formulation of hydramethylnon, sold under the trade name…Read More

  6. Fire Ants

    Currently fire ant mounds are visible all over. The rain we've had causes the ants to move up out of the wet soil to escape the moisture. When it is hot and dry these ants are underground and may not be noticed, unless you are stung. When the ants go unchecked in your yard they can eventually go into the house to forage. They are usually found on the floors, around pet food and in laundry. The bes…Read More

  7. Time to bait for fire ants!

    Fire ant baits are extremely low in toxicity and make it easy to treat large areas effectively. Worker ants take the bait back to the colony, where it is shared with the queen which then either dies or becomes infertile. Baits are slow acting and require weeks to months to achieve 80% to 90% control. We consider them to be an environmentally friendly way of managing a fire ant population. If yo…Read More

  8. Beneficial Nematodes for Flea Control

    If you suspect that your yard may be infested with fleas, beneficial nematodes are a good choice for control. They are microscopic worms that are broadcast into the soil. They feed on flea larvae and can also help with fire ants, white flies, grubs among other undesirable lawn pests. If you pull white socks over your ankles and walk around the yard for a few minutes you should be able to see fleas…Read More

  9. Fire Ants

    Call us to get on our fire ant list...then we will schedule you when the time is right to treat them!  At some time in late spring, fire ants swarm (leaving the colony to create more colonies) and begin foraging for food.  It is around this time that treating is most efficient as the ants will take the bait that is applied and the treatment can stop the new mounds from being formed.  Fire an…Read More

  10. Fire Ants

    Fire ant bait consists of the active ingredient in corn grits coated with soybean oil. Worker ants take the bait back to the colony, where it is shared with the queen, which then either dies or becomes infertile depending on the type of bait being used. Baits are slow-acting and require weeks to months to achieve 80% to 90% control but results can be seen in the first week or two. When the ground …Read More