1. Wasps and Hornets

    Wasps and hornets seem to be particularly bad this year, meaning they are showing up in places people don't want them, like right near a front door or garage! Despite that "too close for comfort" sensation, most wasps and hornets are not a danger to people. In fact, they are predators of spiders, so they can help reduce those around your home. (Side note: a lot of spiders around your home means yo…Read More

  2. Best Time to Treat Fire Ants?

    Fire ants are a summer-long problem around Austin and Central Texas, but there is hope on the horizon! During the hottest part of the summer, fire ants get desperate. Just like other pests they need food and water when it gets hot, and even more so as the seasons start to change and late summer shifts to fall and winter. That urgent search for food can be to a homeowner's advantage! By baiting you…Read More

  3. How Often Do I Need Pest Control?

    If you're wondering when you need to get pest control done, the good news is it's probably not as often as you think! Some people call us asking for information about "monthly" pest control. Unless you have a major infestation that has been ignored for years, you don't need pest control every month. And even then professionals should be able to handle it quickly, without the need to charge you end…Read More

  4. Are Mud Daubers a Problem?

    Mud daubers are often seen buzzing around homes, but are not particularly dangerous. They are about ¾ to 1 inch long. Some are black, while others have yellow markings or can even be a shiny blue-black color. The most obvious difference between other wasps and mud daubers is that mud daubers have a long, narrow waist that connects the thorax to the abdomen. Mud daubers are solitary, not social, i…Read More

  5. Crickets Inside Your Home

    Crickets can become quite a nuisance especially as temperatures change or when food and water become sparse. They may come inside your home to escape or find something to eat or drink. The best treatment is prevention. Here are some tips you can follow to stop crickets early: Crickets and insects in general are attracted to lights. Change outdoor lighting to amber "bug lights" or install a motion-…Read More

  6. Mosquito Update – Control Options!

    We came across this article from a few years ago which has relevant tips and great advice on how to control mosquitoes! While it's been a bit hotter and sunnier now, the recent rains could mean another burst of mosquito activity around Austin. The solution isn't to cover your yard in dangerous sprays that can drift all over and hurt other, helpful insects but to instead control the source. This in…Read More

  7. Can You Seal Out Bugs?

    Is it possible to "pest proof" a house? Exhibit A: New homes with everything still sealed up well are likely to get fewer bugs than an older pier-and-beam house that may have gaps and openings all over. Exhibit B: Most bugs can crawl through millimeter-sized openings. For example an American roach can squeeze through just 3mm — about the size of two stacked pennies. Scorpions reportedly can get …Read More

  8. Why Do I Have Bugs?

    Austin homeowners sometimes call us and say "I have bugs, but it doesn't make sense because we're really clean," to which we point out "Ok, but what about that bag of potato chips you left on the counter last night?" Just kidding. We don't judge. While we do say that cleanliness is important (thanks, Mom!), we also let people know that you can have a spotless home without even a crumb lying around…Read More

  9. Fire Ant Decapitating Flies?

    Fire ants may be the official pest of Texas. For over a century now they have invaded ranches, yards, campgrounds and they even march into homes. They swarm, bite, sting and inflict pain, allergic reactions, itches and even make you dance like a maniac and shake your legs after you step on a mound. Long story short, they are terrible. But what if you could get revenge on fire ants without using an…Read More

  10. BTI for Mosquito Control

    Mosquitoes seem to be particularly bad this year but there are products you can put in your yard that really work! BTI is an excellent, safe example. BTI is an abbreviation for Bacillus Thuringiensis subspecies Israelensis. It's a natural bacterium found in the soil and has toxins that only target mosquito larvae (as well as blackfly and fungus gnat). BTI has no toxicity to people and is even appr…Read More