1. Earwigs

    Earwigs are harmless but the pincers on their rear end can cause fear in some. They are named after a myth that they would crawl into the ear and burrow into the brain. They do not infest homes but will become accidental invaders. You can vacuum or sweep them up. If there are large numbers of them a pest control service may be needed. General Integrated Pest Management (IPM) practices can help kee…Read More

  2. Silverfish Control

    Silverfish can live in envelopes and will eat clothing and do damage to papers, etc if left unchecked. They are usually found in stored boxes. You can purchase silverfish baits online, and if they are fresh, they can be effective. We recommend buying a roach powder (99% orthoboric acid, 1% inert ingredients) and dusting boxes that have papers, etc in them (available at Home Depot, etc). If you hav…Read More

  3. Ticks and Chiggers

    Sulfur helps to control chiggers and ticks. Many consider it to be safe and effective. It is a useful soil additive for alkaline soil, such as much of our Texas soil. Feed stores carry it – broadcast 5# per 1000 square feet. If your soil is acid, don’t over do it as it can unbalance the soil microorganisms. I have read that it repels pests, including chinch bugs and grubs. Chiggers can also be…Read More

  4. Wood Ants Are On The Move

    As it's starting to warm up outside we are starting to get a lot of calls about ants crawling on people's homes. These are usually wood boring ants, which around here are usually carpenter ants or acrobat ants. These ants do not eat wood like termites do, so damage is minimal, but they can be tougher to deal with as the get more embedded.  Ants swarm in the spring and fall, so it is common to see…Read More

  5. Fire Ant Season is Approaching!

    With all the recent rain you may have seen fire ant mounds popping up as they get themselves out of the waterlogged soil.  Although they are visible they probably aren't foraging yet. Using baits for fire ant control is the best and least toxic way of handling them. However, if the soil temperature is below 70 degrees they probably won't be foraging which means the bait won't get picked up in a t…Read More

  6. Pantry Pests

    Small brown "beetles" can be brought home from the grocery store and infest your pantry items. They can be difficult to get a handle on and pesticides are not particularly helpful in this situation. The source of the issues is larvae in the food. Everything that is opened should be inspected then thrown away. They particularity like spices, bread crumbs and cereals.  Anything that is not in a can…Read More

  7. Beneficial Nematodes for Fleas

    Now is a good time of year to have your yard treated with beneficial nematodes. While we apply them specifically for fleas, they can help with fire ants, white grubs & other soil pests. If the soil temperature is above 80 degrees you need to water the yard until it is muddy before we can apply them. You would then need to keep it damp for 3 days. Imagine having to do that when it's 105 degrees…Read More

  8. Do I Have Roof Rats?

    Most people don't realize they have a problem with rats until they hear them in the attic or under the house. Occasionally you might find fruit chewed into or even one scurry across the floor. There are some other sign that you can look for, before it gets to that point. Droppings- Rat dropping kind of look like dark brown rice, but tapered at the ends. It's usually found in places where they have…Read More

  9. German Cockroaches

    German Roaches are light brown to tan and the adults grow up to about ½” to 5/8” in length. Although the adults have fully developed wings they do not fly. It is a widespread household pest. They feed on any food sources available including grease, soap and the binding of books. They can survive without food for up to 30 days, but will die from dehydration if they do not have moisture for mor…Read More

  10. Texas Leaf Cutter Ants

    Leaf cutter ants can damage fruit trees and ornamental vegetation quickly. They can be very difficult to handle. These ants have very large colonies that can spread up to 100 ft long under the ground. They use the leaves they bring back to the colony as a fungus farm to feed the colony. For this reason baits tend to be ineffective. A special formulation of hydramethylnon, sold under the trade name…Read More